About Pilates

What is Pilates?

Pilates is a whole body strengthening and conditioning method designed to facilitate uniform development of the body. The underlying principles of breathing, precision and the mind's complete control of the body makes Pilates unique in the world of fitness. The entire Classical Pilates repertoire includes more than 500 individual exercises practiced on the mat or specifically designed equipment such as the Universal Reformer, Chair and Cadillac.

Benefits of Pilates

Regular practice of Pilates results in improved balance and co-ordination as well as long, lean and supple muscles. Strength without bulk! Muscles are not worked to the point of fatigue which means it's a perfect complimentary, cross training method that can support your other training regimes without interfering with them. Whether it's running, cycling, or gymnastics, Pilates can help you improve your control of your body and improve your form whatever your passion may be.

"Be the best you can be, by developing the power of your whole body under your full control."

History of Pilates

Developed by Joseph Pilates during the early part of the 20th Century his method of Contrology, as he termed it, became popular with New York's dance and theatre professionals during the 1940s and 50s. Clients turned to Pilates to help them rehabilitate from injury as well as improve their performance. Pilates developed his method throughout his lifetime, continually inventing new equipment to provide greater support or new challenges for his clients.

After his death in 1967 Pilates' work was continued in his original New York studio by his partner Clara and some of his early students. After the 1960s several of these students opened their own studios in New York and elsewhere in the U.S. and continued to develop their own work from his original method. A number of Pilates lineages and teacher training programmes developed from those original students until 2000 when a U.S. court ruling deemed the term 'Pilates' generic which gave way for a huge number of training courses and variations of the method to develop. As a result the Pilates method continues to evolve with some lines taking inspiration from the world of physical therapy, other movement or fitness disciplines.

Classical Pilates

Those who are passionate about the Classical work are dedicated to staying as true to Joseph's original teachings as possible, thereby ensuring that clients achieve the benefits of the method as it was designed.

Classical teachers may come from a variety of different schools however the work they teach is true to the original repertoire and flow. Those who are comprehensively trained use the full range of Pilates equipment to help clients develop their whole body to achieve natural, healthy movement.